it's a process

Oct 17

Recent sculpture. This is all one piece. There are internal magnets and ballasts that allow for different balancing and positions.


Oct 12

My backsaws are on a jobsite so I’m using my mitsukawa ryoba for some small parts, and flush cutting some pins as well, which it excels at thanks the zero offset tooth geometry. Generally enjoying how my benchhook does not have a propensity to jettison small parts across the room.


Oct 9

About to do 2 parallel 20’ long inverted festool rip cuts to begin my latest internet connected shade installation. Wishing I had a TS 55, the 75 gets pretty heavy. Find myself reaching for my Stanley No. 68 folding rule a lot these days.  The gradations have grooves that a sharp pencil lead sits in nicely.  Nobody makes a modern equivalent- this may be because the gradation stamping mechanism is not a feasible tooling these days, and laser engraving doesn’t play well with brass.

 Also I am liking the Tajima ink rite a lot , v accurate.


Oct 8

Back on the jobsite for a bit.  I am pretty happy with my mobile shop setup, it has taken some years to refine. 


Oct 1

I have put backing panels on the cabinets, the only non solid wood component.  I selected a sheet that combined the grain patterns of both cabinets, some quarter sawn and some flat sawn figure.  The piece was composed of fairly wide book matched flitches, and I end matched this at the intersection of the two cabinets, as seen in the first photo.  This will help with the visual flow of the two cabinets, which I was a tad apprehensive about since one is made from a single 8/4 flat sawn board, and the other from a quarter sawn board.  There is a lot of figure repetition within each piece because they were milled from a single source.  There is also a tension between the two pieces; they are the same material, the same tree, yet they have very different grain figure because of how they were milled.  So part of the backing panels’ role here is to unite the two different cabinet components.  


Sep 30

Trimming dovetails, plowing and cutting rebates


Sep 29

Made some dovetail clamping blocks front some rift sawn oak scraps.  I took my current dovetail layout, and cut them big by following the wrong side of the line.  


Sep 28
Re defining a shoulder.

Re defining a shoulder.


After re dimensioning the carcass by about 1/16”, I clamped straight edges to the vertical sides before re cutting the shelves.  Had I done this initially I would have saved myself many hours of work.  When working with thin stock, the use of straight edges is paramount during assembly and fitting.   Eventually, the carcass back and the and the shelves + standards will create a torsion box of sorts and will serve to keep everything square and straight.  

After re dimensioning the carcass by about 1/16”, I clamped straight edges to the vertical sides before re cutting the shelves.  Had I done this initially I would have saved myself many hours of work.  When working with thin stock, the use of straight edges is paramount during assembly and fitting.  Eventually, the carcass back and the and the shelves + standards will create a torsion box of sorts and will serve to keep everything square and straight.  


Sep 26

A few of the shelves were short, owing to a slightly bowed in vertical carcass board, which should have have had a straightedge on it during assembly. I am lengthening some pins by redefining the shoulders, which will in turn shrink the carcass.


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