it's a process

Aug 26

This looks like a nice lil stack of curly maple I found in back of a barn upstate. I am going to try my hand at making some veneers and doing some simple parquetry.


Aug 22

Back in the shop, with safety glasses. Spending some quality time with the Tormek rehabbing a handful of old James Swan Co firmer and mortising chisels while the finish dries on the table.  These we my grandpas chisels, and are supposed to be very good steel.  They are certainly taking a while to sharpen; its not every day that I regrind a 2” chisel.  I am hollow grinding with the tormek, taking the hollow out with the DMT, and finishing up with Japanese water stones, 800, 100, 4000, 6000, 8000.


Aug 19

Eye protection

Just spent the day in the NYC ear and eye infirmary. Heart pine splinter in the eye. I’ve been doing only hand tool work, nothing flying around in the air, and it happened at the end of the day, while I was cleaning up. They used a dremel tool, basically, to remove it.

I get stuff in my eyes a lot, despite the fact that I wear eye protection a lot. I consider myself pretty adept at removing particulate from my eye with a Q tip or what have you. I am very fond of neodymium magnets for ferrous metals. But this thing was lodged, and right in the center of me pupil. Very painful. And getting it removed was even worse.

Wear eye protection my fellow woodworkers!


Aug 18

Mortises done and tenons thicknessed. I knew this would have a lot of cross grain movement, and seeing it all glued up is reinforcing that. Right now the end mortises are allowing for about 3/8” in both directions from center.  I’ll be able to calculate that more precisely later.


Aug 17
Laying out the mortises on the new breadboard ends.

Laying out the mortises on the new breadboard ends.


Fetched a chunk of reclaimed pine and resawed it. Laying it out and about to glue it up.


The table needs to be 10” wider than before, bringing it to 38”. I cut it down the middle, and popped off the breadboard ends. This was fairly easy, since they were only glued in the middle. I will be adding the breadth in the middle, and will add another few tenons as well.

. These additional middle tenons will not slide, but rather will fix the breadboard ends in the middle, allowing the table slab to expand / contract laterally on either side, in opposite directions.

Aug 13
I got this table back in my shop for a bit, the client wants it stretched.  So I told him I’d use the board stretcher, which is actually one of the first woodworking tools I learned about as a 14 year old apprentice working on construction sites…. Ahem.  Anyway, this will involve taking the breadboard ends off, sawing the table down the middle, adding more wood, remaking breadboard ends, and re assembling. 

Even though the wood was at 7%mc when I built it it’s shrunk considerably. I really like this evidence of movement, the sliding double tenon works very well, it’s a natural, passive hygrometer.

I got this table back in my shop for a bit, the client wants it stretched. So I told him I’d use the board stretcher, which is actually one of the first woodworking tools I learned about as a 14 year old apprentice working on construction sites…. Ahem. Anyway, this will involve taking the breadboard ends off, sawing the table down the middle, adding more wood, remaking breadboard ends, and re assembling.

Even though the wood was at 7%mc when I built it it’s shrunk considerably. I really like this evidence of movement, the sliding double tenon works very well, it’s a natural, passive hygrometer.


Aug 5

Jul 30
Old Room, 675 Hudson. Photo by Oto Gillen.

Old Room, 675 Hudson. Photo by Oto Gillen.


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